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December 18, 2020
Top 20 Stories of 2020
Article-Ruth-Reichl-Food-Critic-Menu-Menuland

We picked a few story highlights from a very memorable year, including a close look at the industrial croissant, a dive into the restaurant industry’s pivot to meal kits, and a celebration of sardine collecting.

Our year of working remotely, cooking our pants off, and generally spending more time indoors huddled around glowing screens (but also huddled in our kitchens) provided the backdrop for the slate of stories we published over the past 12 months. In early 2021, we will be celebrating four years of publishing TASTE, and even in spite of our inability to travel freely and report stories from the field, this year has easily been our strongest. The lineup of stories each week (as well as our three weekly newsletters) kept our small editorial team on our toes. So, how do you pick 20 favorites? It’s impossible, but here goes nothing. 

The year kicked off with Priya Krishna traveling to Ruth Reichl’s upstate New York house to sort through her menus and talk about her days reviewing restaurants in New York City and Los Angeles (this year, Priya not only wrapped up her limited yogurt column, she also reported about the restaurant industry’s pivot to meal kits and the pandemic-proof pizza industry.) Assistant editor Tatiana Bautista reported on the mutual aid movement sweeping the country; senior editor Anna Hezel wrote about the art of sardine collecting; and Aaron Hutcherson reconsidered the Rice Krispies Treat. TASTE loves to do a deep dive, and deep dive we did, into rotisserie chicken, food media’s rapid shift to the email newsletter, 100-year-old tare, and the industrial croissant. We’re very excited to bring you more from TASTE in 2021. Thank you for reading! – Matt Rodbard    

God Save Lard Bread

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God Save Lard Bread

The name might be a tough sell, but the salami- and prosciutto-filled bread has its fans, and a few dedicated bakers are keeping it alive.